Story time

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Embrace a period of rambling discovery

Cut short of the floundering and you’ve cut short the possible creative outcomes. Cheat on the chaotic stumbling-about, and you’ve robbed yourself of the raw stuff that feeds the imagination.

For many of us, staying loose is an uncomfortable, unsettling feeling if sustained for too long. Ambiguity is confusing, even alarming. We like to frame our inquiries in sharply delineated terms and prefer clean, tidy resolutions to yes or no dictions. Fuzzy circumstances, the ragtag and bobtail of daily uncertainty, exhaust us. It’s much nicer, we think, to have our options cast as either black or white, entirely excluding the hazy middle zones of gray.

Creative people, by contrast, seem to have a great tolerance for the ambiguous circumstances that begin most projects and are more accepting, even welcoming, of this unstructured time. They aren’t lusting after quick outcomes or definitive bottom lines. They are more willing to entertain a prolonged period of leisurely drifting about, curious to see where the unpredictable currents will take them. From this lightness of spirit come the fruits of imagination; there will be plenty of time for the sweat of exertion later on.

The point, in essence, is that the “temperament of receptivity” Oscar Wilde believed was required to appreciate art is also required to create it — a permeable membrane between mind and world is what allows the creative force to flow through, to transmute one into the other and back again, until the final work of genius is birthed. Much of creative genius, however, lies in the editing process that chooses what flows in and what flows out — that to invent is to choose.

The editing process — creating form from chaos — is at the heart of his art.

“Staying loose” is essentially a matter of open-mindedness, or what modern psychologists like to call “divergent thinking.”  

Staying loose, allowing yourself the freedom to ramble, opening yourself up to outside influences, keeping a flexible mind willing to entertain all sorts of notions and avenues — this is the attitude that is most appropriate for the start of any project where the aim is to generate something new.

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Heart felt 

The Heart.

“What was said to the rose that made it open was said to me here in my chest.” – Rumi

Our hearts beat in unison…

The heart space, our central channel — is a four-chamber phenomenon that not only symbolizes vitality, but wisdom, a seat for emotions and the most potent energy we could ever experience, conjure or share: love

Your heart is about the size of your fist (as is your stomach) and weighs and estimated ten ounces (equivalent to about ten slices of bread). It’s located just behind and slightly left of your breastbone or sternum. And the heart, unlike the brain whose narration often has us giving up before we even get started, is vigilant. ‘Think’ about it…tick-tock, tick-tock, tick-tock…

One of the heart’s extraordinary physiological responsibilities is to pump life-giving oxygenated blood through the network of arteries and veins in your body — also known as the cardiovascular system. The repetitious pumping action of the heart is caused by a flow of electricity — this rhythm is known as sinus rhythm.

But after reading the following points, you’ll discover that our precious heart space may just have a number of other quite vital operations…

**

#1 The heart is the very first organ to form in the human body.

Therefore it’s older than the brain, perhaps even wiser, aye?! The arms and legs bud from the same tissue as the heart. Therefor is it not beautiful to think that we connect heart-to-heart through the touch of our hands and connect with the Earth through the ‘souls’ or pulse of our feet?

It has been found that when two people touch (or are within a range of an estimated three-feet of one another), the heart wave of one can be seen in the brain wave of another. So when we reach out to someone, we’re literally, in a sense, reaching out with our hearts.

Is there a more powerful healing therapy than touch and closeness no matter the circumstance?

Researchers say that the heart is the first to develop and function due to it being an electromagnetic field generator — as it continuously beats, it sends out electromagnetic waves that contain essential information to the developing fetus.

On top of that…

**

#2 The electro-magnetic field of the heart is said to be 5,000 times greater than that of the brain! 

According to Wikipedia, an electromagnetic field (also EMF or EM field) is a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. It affects the behavior of charged objects in the vicinity of the field. The electromagnetic field extends indefinitely throughout space and describes the electromagnetic interaction. It is one of the four fundamental forces of nature (the others are gravitation, weak interaction and strong interaction).

An electromagnetic field is produced by both our brain and our heart. The electromagnetivity of the heart is measured by an ECG or an electrocardiogram. This instrument measures the electrical pulses sent out from the heart to the rest of the body. Did you know that a person’s ECG reading is as unique as their fingerprints?

It has been found that a person’s heart-field radiates anywhere between three and ten feet around their body. And in a study called The Electricity of Touch: Detection and Measurement of Cardiac Energy Exchange Between People, one of the author’s concluded that, “When people touch or are in proximity, a transference of the electromagnetic energy produced by the heart occurs.” And, according to #1, can be seen visually in the brain waves of one another.

In addition, Dr. Gregg Braden, states, “In the past few years, our own science has made a radical, revolutionary discovery that changes everything about the way we think of ourselves and the world. What they found is that when we create heart-based feelings of gratitude, appreciation, care-literally, using the muscle of the heart to create these feelings-what we’re actually doing is generating a magnetic field inside our bodies that is part of the magnetic field of the Earth…”

What does this all mean?

a. Practices that are based on a therapeutic touch, or in other words, based on an exchange of (heart) energy to facilitate healing, have been proven to have many substantive and positive effects – the discovery that this exchange emanates from the heart represents just how powerful an exchange of energy between people can be — and can and should be explored more! The best part — we don’t have to wait — apply the loving touch of your own hands upon request. This doesn’t mean just a few people can offer this — it means everyonewho has a heart can offer a healing, life-enhancing, loving touch.

b. Your heart can change the course for all life on the planet — today. It is quite possible that the quality of energy intentionally manifested in our own heart space can be felt not only by the rest of the world, but by our most precious mother, The Earth. So why not conjure up the power you hold within your four-chambers and see what effect it has on the collective consciousness of those around you.

**

#3 The heart is a muscle, an organ and…a mind. The heart, like the brain, contains neural matter. What this means is that it can communicate to all parts of the body just like the brain. It’s also been recently discovered that the heart may have more control over the body than the brain. In addition, the heart sends more information to the brain than the brain sends to heart.

According to Harvard Medical School, chemical dialogue between the two, the heart and the brain, affect both of them and the entire body. For example, sadness, stress, loneliness, optimism, and other psychosocial factors influence the heart and the health of the heart can affect the brain. The health of the heart and the brain can positively or negatively impact the rest of the body.

Bringing the heart and the brain into harmony, also known as coherence, can therefore offer the body positive side effects of such a matrimony — improved overall functioning, lower cortisol and blood pressure, and an improved immune system. The heart can also be trained to respond to highly intense situations without stress and tension — this being learned through an intentional practice of manifesting gratitude, peace and love.

**

Love is an electromagnetic phenomenon. You can feel when a person is offering something from a place of love — it feels deeper, meaningful, sincere and without the need to judge. It also offers and invitation toward liberation and tranquility…of healing and improvement. Imagine what it would feel like if each and every one of us began to nourish ourselves with the wisdom of our own hearts. We all have a lot to gain if we allow ourselves to explore this natural powers we all possess — of the heart.

So how do we change? How can we make a difference in the world? It’s ‘easy’… we follow the path of our heart. We follow the path of our heart. We follow the path of our heart.

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Heart felt 

The Heart.

“What was said to the rose that made it open was said to me here in my chest.” – Rumi

Our hearts beat in unison…

The heart space, our central channel — is a four-chamber phenomenon that not only symbolizes vitality, but wisdom, a seat for emotions and the most potent energy we could ever experience, conjure or share: love

Your heart is about the size of your fist (as is your stomach) and weighs and estimated ten ounces (equivalent to about ten slices of bread). It’s located just behind and slightly left of your breastbone or sternum. And the heart, unlike the brain whose narration often has us giving up before we even get started, is vigilant. ‘Think’ about it…tick-tock, tick-tock, tick-tock…

One of the heart’s extraordinary physiological responsibilities is to pump life-giving oxygenated blood through the network of arteries and veins in your body — also known as the cardiovascular system. The repetitious pumping action of the heart is caused by a flow of electricity — this rhythm is known as sinus rhythm.

But after reading the following points, you’ll discover that our precious heart space may just have a number of other quite vital operations…

**

#1 The heart is the very first organ to form in the human body.

Therefore it’s older than the brain, perhaps even wiser, aye?! The arms and legs bud from the same tissue as the heart. Therefor is it not beautiful to think that we connect heart-to-heart through the touch of our hands and connect with the Earth through the ‘souls’ or pulse of our feet?

It has been found that when two people touch (or are within a range of an estimated three-feet of one another), the heart wave of one can be seen in the brain wave of another. So when we reach out to someone, we’re literally, in a sense, reaching out with our hearts.

Is there a more powerful healing therapy than touch and closeness no matter the circumstance?

Researchers say that the heart is the first to develop and function due to it being an electromagnetic field generator — as it continuously beats, it sends out electromagnetic waves that contain essential information to the developing fetus.

On top of that…

**

#2 The electro-magnetic field of the heart is said to be 5,000 times greater than that of the brain! 

According to Wikipedia, an electromagnetic field (also EMF or EM field) is a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. It affects the behavior of charged objects in the vicinity of the field. The electromagnetic field extends indefinitely throughout space and describes the electromagnetic interaction. It is one of the four fundamental forces of nature (the others are gravitation, weak interaction and strong interaction).

An electromagnetic field is produced by both our brain and our heart. The electromagnetivity of the heart is measured by an ECG or an electrocardiogram. This instrument measures the electrical pulses sent out from the heart to the rest of the body. Did you know that a person’s ECG reading is as unique as their fingerprints?

It has been found that a person’s heart-field radiates anywhere between three and ten feet around their body. And in a study called The Electricity of Touch: Detection and Measurement of Cardiac Energy Exchange Between People, one of the author’s concluded that, “When people touch or are in proximity, a transference of the electromagnetic energy produced by the heart occurs.” And, according to #1, can be seen visually in the brain waves of one another.

In addition, Dr. Gregg Braden, states, “In the past few years, our own science has made a radical, revolutionary discovery that changes everything about the way we think of ourselves and the world. What they found is that when we create heart-based feelings of gratitude, appreciation, care-literally, using the muscle of the heart to create these feelings-what we’re actually doing is generating a magnetic field inside our bodies that is part of the magnetic field of the Earth…”

What does this all mean?

a. Practices that are based on a therapeutic touch, or in other words, based on an exchange of (heart) energy to facilitate healing, have been proven to have many substantive and positive effects – the discovery that this exchange emanates from the heart represents just how powerful an exchange of energy between people can be — and can and should be explored more! The best part — we don’t have to wait — apply the loving touch of your own hands upon request. This doesn’t mean just a few people can offer this — it means everyonewho has a heart can offer a healing, life-enhancing, loving touch.

b. Your heart can change the course for all life on the planet — today. It is quite possible that the quality of energy intentionally manifested in our own heart space can be felt not only by the rest of the world, but by our most precious mother, The Earth. So why not conjure up the power you hold within your four-chambers and see what effect it has on the collective consciousness of those around you.

**

#3 The heart is a muscle, an organ and…a mind. The heart, like the brain, contains neural matter. What this means is that it can communicate to all parts of the body just like the brain. It’s also been recently discovered that the heart may have more control over the body than the brain. In addition, the heart sends more information to the brain than the brain sends to heart.

According to Harvard Medical School, chemical dialogue between the two, the heart and the brain, affect both of them and the entire body. For example, sadness, stress, loneliness, optimism, and other psychosocial factors influence the heart and the health of the heart can affect the brain. The health of the heart and the brain can positively or negatively impact the rest of the body.

Bringing the heart and the brain into harmony, also known as coherence, can therefore offer the body positive side effects of such a matrimony — improved overall functioning, lower cortisol and blood pressure, and an improved immune system. The heart can also be trained to respond to highly intense situations without stress and tension — this being learned through an intentional practice of manifesting gratitude, peace and love.

**

Love is an electromagnetic phenomenon. You can feel when a person is offering something from a place of love — it feels deeper, meaningful, sincere and without the need to judge. It also offers and invitation toward liberation and tranquility…of healing and improvement. Imagine what it would feel like if each and every one of us began to nourish ourselves with the wisdom of our own hearts. We all have a lot to gain if we allow ourselves to explore this natural powers we all possess — of the heart.

So how do we change? How can we make a difference in the world? It’s ‘easy’… we follow the path of our heart. We follow the path of our heart. We follow the path of our heart.

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Fall in Love with her Scars

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Our greatest aliveness is buried deep in our most insurmountable challenges. To strive for more aliveness, we must challenge ourselves. We must have the heart and stomach to step onto the path unknown.
To be a warrior on the outside, we must first become that warrior on the inside. This takes training, practice, consistency, gentleness…and an awareness to what we put into it, how it feels and if it is honest in that it truly nourishes our purpose from within.

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The term magical realism to define a genre that reacted against the dominant realism and naturalism of the 19th century

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Jorge Luis Borges

Occupation Writer, poet, translator, editor, critic, librarian
Language Spanish
Nationality Argentine

Jorge Francisco Isidoro Luis Borges was an Argentine short-story writer, essayist, poet and translator, and a key figure in Spanish language literature. His work embraces the “character of unreality in all literature”. His best-known books, Ficciones (Fictions) and The Aleph (El Aleph), published in the 1940s, are compilations of short stories interconnected by common themes, including dreams, labyrinths, libraries, mirrors, fictional writers, philosophy, and religion.

Borges’s works have contributed to philosophical literature and also to the fantasy genre. Critic Ángel Flores, the first to use the term magical realism to define a genre that reacted against the dominant realism and naturalism of the 19th century, considers the beginning of the movement to be the release of Borges’s A Universal History of Infamy (Historia universal de la infamia). However, some critics would consider Borges to be a predecessor and not actually a magical realist. His late poems dialogue with such cultural figures as Spinoza, Camões, and Virgil.

In 1914 his family moved to Switzerland, where he studied at the Collège de Genève. The family travelled widely in Europe, including stays in Spain. On his return to Argentina in 1921, Borges began publishing his poems and essays in surrealist literary journals. He also worked as a librarian and public lecturer. In 1955 he was appointed director of the National Public Library and professor of English Literature at the University of Buenos Aires. He became completely blind at the age of 55; as he never learned braille, he became unable to read. Scholars have suggested that his progressive blindness helped him to create innovative literary symbols through imagination.[5] In 1961 he came to international attention when he received the first Formentor prize (Prix International), which he shared with Samuel Beckett. In 1971 he won the Jerusalem Prize. His work was translated and published widely in the United States and in Europe. Borges himself was fluent in several languages. He dedicated his final work, The Conspirators, to the city of Geneva, Switzerland.

His international reputation was consolidated in the 1960s, aided by his works being available in English, by the Latin American Boom and by the success of García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude. Writer and essayist J. M. Coetzee said of him: “He, more than anyone, renovated the language of fiction and thus opened the way to a remarkable generation of Spanish American novelists.”.

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Few artists have built grand structures on such uncertain foundations as Jorge Luis Borges. Doubt was the sacred principle of his work, its animating force and, frequently, its message. To read his stories is to experience the dissolution of all certainty, all assumption about the reliability of your experience of the world. Of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, Borges seems to have been the least convinced by himself—by the imposing public illusion of his own fame. The thing Borges was most skeptical about was the idea of a writer, a man, named Borges.

In his memorable prose piece “Borges and I,” he addresses a deeply felt distinction between himself and “the other one, the one called Borges.” “I like hourglasses,” he writes, “maps, eighteenth-century typography, the taste of coffee, and the prose of Stevenson; he shares these preferences, but in a vain way that turns them into the attributes of an actor.” He recognizes almost nothing of himself in the eminent literary personage with whom he shares a name, a face, and certain other superficial qualities. “I do not know which of us has written this page,” he concludes.

This haunting, teasing fragment is reproduced in its entirety in “Borges at Eighty: Conversations,” a collection of interviews from his 1980 trip to the U.S., which has been published in a new edition by New Directions. It’s an instructively ironic context for the piece to turn up in—a transcript of a public event at Indiana University in which a number of Borges’s poems and prose pieces were read aloud in English, followed by a short extemporaneous commentary by the author. When he addresses the audience, he seems to be speaking for the “I,” but it is surely “Borges” who is doing the talking:

Borges stands for all the things I hate. He stands for publicity, for being photographed, for having interviews, for politics, for opinions—all opinions are despicable I should say. He also stands for those two nonentities, those two impostors failure and success […] He deals in those things. While I, let us say, since the name of the paper is “Borges and I”, I stands not for the public man but for the private self, for reality, since these other things are unreal to me.
For someone who hated being interviewed, Borges was a prolific and garrulous interviewee (although it was perhaps “Borges” who handled that side of things). And yet, to point this out is to risk missing the substance of what he is saying here, which is not simply that he feels himself at odds with his own public persona but that he feels himself profoundly at odds with how little he is at odds with it. (Such paradoxes are an occupational hazard in any encounter with Borges.) One of the collection’s most interesting aspects is the interaction of these incompatible elements: the obvious pleasure Borges takes in the opportunity to present himself for public consumption, and his reflexive skepticism about the necessary fraudulence of the writer as personality.

There’s something fascinatingly Borgesian about the way in which the self-awareness of the performance is itself highly performative. This preoccupation with the divided self veers close to a sort of ontological double act, a one-man odd-couple routine. “Everyone sitting in this audience wants to know Jorge Luis Borges,” begins the interviewer, in the first of this book’s conversations. Borges replies, “I wish I did. I am sick and tired of him.” For a writer, he was not greatly exercised by the topic of himself. He was interested in his interests and not the contingent fact that it was he, Borges, who was interested in them. Being himself was never much more than drudgery. “When I wake up,” he tells one of his interviewees, “I always feel I’m being let down. Because, well, here I am. Here’s the same old stupid game going on. I have to be somebody. I have to be exactly that somebody. I have certain commitments. One of the commitments is to live through the whole day.”

Borges never wrote a work of fiction longer than fourteen pages. “It is a laborious madness and an impoverishing one,” he wrote in 1941, “the madness of composing vast books—setting out in five hundred pages an idea that can be perfectly related orally in five minutes.” But I think, perhaps, that the real reason he never wrote a novel was that the form is largely dependent on character, and Borges had no real interest in, or facility for, the creation of psychologically vivid people. (Try relating Leopold Bloom orally in five minutes, or Mrs. Dalloway, or Anna Karenina. Their greatness as characters arises out of their irreducibility to the facts about themselves.) He wasn’t much for fleshing out, and he was not the kind of writer whose characters ever had a chance of “taking over” from their creator. His most indelible creations—Funes the Memorious, say, or Pierre Menard—are memorable not for the contents of their invented souls but for the situations that he placed them in, the ingenious conceits that worked their way into narrative through the idea of their particular madness. His characters—including the one called Borges, the recurring protagonist of so many of his fictions—tended to be ciphers. They were fictions made from fiction, drawn from reading, not from life. And he himself, the character who he happened to be in the framing narrative called reality, was not much different. “Why on earth,” he asks in another of these conversations, “should I worry what happens to Borges? After all, Borges is nothing, a mere fiction.”

The man we see in these eleven interviews is a person made of books, a librarian who often remarked that his idea of paradise was an endless library—a sort of eternal busman’s holiday. He speaks of himself as a reader first and a writer only secondarily. That this self-conception emerges out of his scrupulous humility and instinct for self-effacement doesn’t make it any less accurate or revealing. Borges’s writing was always, to some degree, a creative form of reading, and many of his best fictions were meditations on the condition of fictionality: reviews of invented books, stories whose central presences were not people but texts. He was a man of letters in the nineteenth-century mode, possessed of a type of encyclopedic erudition that seems not to exist anymore. And this brings us to one of the structural paradoxes at the heart of Borges’s work. He was deeply invested in the past, in the idea of a living and evolving literary tradition. “I think of myself as not being a modern writer,” he says here. “I don’t think of myself as a contemporary of surrealism, or dadaism, or imagism, or the other respected tomfooleries of literature, no? I think of literature in terms of the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century. I am a lover of Bernard Shaw, Henry James.” And yet this strangely totalizing conservatism was the basis of Borges’s radical legacy, a new way of thinking about fiction and its relationship to the world.

That extent to which he was steeped in tradition can also be seen in another new book published by New Directions, “Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature.” The book collects the transcripts of a lecture course on the history of English literature that Borges gave at the University of Buenos Aires in 1966. It’s both shamelessly comprehensive and entirely idiosyncratic, launching with the Anglo-Saxons and coming to rest, twenty-five lectures later, on Robert Louis Stevenson, a writer especially beloved of Borges. Unfortunately, it doesn’t make for particularly gripping reading. His approach to most of the works that he’s lecturing on is largely descriptive, so that we get a fairly exhaustive rundown of what happens in “Beowulf,” say, or some of the more interesting aspects of Boswell’s Johnson, but not nearly the insight into either you’d expect from a great literary mind.

The “Borges” who is revealed, or perhaps performed, in these two books seems like the Platonic ideal of the man of letters: a man who taught himself German because he wanted to read Schopenhauer in the original, and learned it, moreover, by reading the poetry of Heine; a man who taught himself Icelandic in order to pursue his interest in Norse sagas. His loss of sight seems strangely appropriate; in the interviews, he speaks of the “luminous mist” of his blindness as though it were a kind of blessing, a removal of all distraction from what was most important, most real—the life of the mind. (And there was never any shortage of people willing to read to the great writer in his old age.)

But there were things that Borges didn’t see whose invisibility had nothing to do with his physical blindness—things he didn’t see because he wasn’t interested in looking at them. The lecture course in “Professor Borges” doesn’t feature anything written by a woman. It’s a history of English literature that includes no Austen, no Shelley, no Charlotte or Emily Brontë, no Eliot, and no Woolf. He was a great admirer of Emily Dickinson’s poetry, but even that admiration is not without its strain of condescension: in an interview with the collection’s editor, Willis Barnstone, he describes her as “the most passionate of all women who have attempted writing.” I laughed out loud when I read this, and then decided to extend Borges the benefit of the doubt, given the context of an unscripted conversation in a language that—despite his Anglophilic protestations—was not his first. But then I came to this moment, sixteen pages further on, in a conversation with Alastair Reid and John Coleman at the New York PEN Club:

COLEMAN: Borges, you have spoken of literary men you admire, what about literary women? Could you identify the women in literature whose contribution you consider most significant?
BORGES: I think I would limit myself to one, to Emily Dickinson.
COLEMAN: Is that it?
BORGES: That’s that. Short and sweet.
REID: I think it should be pointed out, however, that there are more.
BORGES: Yes, of course. There is Silvina Ocampo, for example, who is translating Emily Dickinson at this moment in Buenos Aires.
Borges’s fictional universe is relentlessly, oppressively male. He wrote very few female characters, and there is a vision of masculinity—violent, fearless, austere—that exists in his work as a counterpoint to its obsessive bookishness, and neither ideal has much room for the presence of women, writers or otherwise. His abstraction meant, among other things, a removal from the heat and chaos of human relationships. There is very little love in his work, very little emotional intensity; its richness and complexity is that of philosophical problems, of theology and ontology, not of human relationships.

And it is certainly not that of the wider human complexity of politics. An aloofness from mere politics seems like a strength in his fiction, but it’s hard to come away from reading these interviews seeing it as anything other than a serious weakness in his life. Understandably, he is often asked to speak about Argentina’s recent history of tyranny and brutality; repeatedly, he finds ways of evading these questions. And the ways in which he says nothing often end up being more revealing than he intends. On “The Dick Cavett Show,” Cavett asked him if he could account for the level of sympathy for the Nazis in Argentina. “Look here,” said Borges. “I don’t profess to understand my country. I am not politically minded, either. I do my best to avoid politics. I belong to no party. I am an individualist.” Pressed on the topic of Hitler, Borges said that “of course I hate and loathe him. His anti-Semitism was very foolish.” This is hard to read because, although we should know better, it’s difficult to stop ourselves expecting wisdom from a person who happens to be a genius. Hitler’s anti-Semitism might well have been foolish, but that was pretty far from being its most remarkable aspect.

Borges’s refusal to engage with politics wouldn’t have been nearly so remarkable had he not lived through two World Wars and, in his own country, six coups d’états and three dictatorships. In an interview revealingly titled “But I Prefer Dreaming,” an audience member asks him what he thinks the role of the artist should be in a threatened society. Rather than saying that the role of the artist should be to make art, he gives an answer that seems itself oddly threatened and elusive. “I have no use for politics,” he says. “I am not politically minded. I am aesthetically minded, philosophically perhaps. I don’t belong to any party. In fact, I disbelieve in politics and in nations. I disbelieve also in richness, in poverty. Those things are illusions. But I believe in my own destiny as a good or bad or indifferent writer.” Borges’s skepticism was deeply felt, but here it does look like a tactical withdrawal from the very real terror and anarchy and injustice of the world, a retreat into the luminous mist of his own blindness. His fiction was no less great for its abstraction, but there is something ultimately sad about this great architect of labyrinths who would not enter into the ramifying complexity of his own century.

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Self-Expression

“We thus see the artist performing a dual function: first, furthering the integrity of the process of self-expression in the language of art; and secondly, protecting the organic continuity of art in relation to its own laws. For like any organic substance, art must always be in a state of flux, the tempo being slow or fast. But it must move.”
― Mark Rothko, The Artist’s Reality: Philosophies of Art

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